Comprehensive cancer team

“They’ve made my journey an easy journey. I couldn’t have done it without them physically or mentally. They’re awesome.”

– Chuck

COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CARE

“They’ve made my journey an easy journey. I couldn’t have done it without them physically or mentally. They’re awesome.”

– Chuck

Urologic Cancers

Urology Medical of North Florida is committed to providing state-of-the-art, compassionate care to our cancer patients. Our partnership with Cancer Care of North Florida gives you access to oncology specialists who, like us, live and work right here in our community. As a team, we create a treatment plan to meet your individual needs. This coordinated and personal approach ensures you have the best possible quality of life and outcome.

TYPES OF CANCER

Prostate Cancer

About Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the prostate.

The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system. It lies just below the bladder (the organ that collects and empties urine) and in front of the rectum (the lower part of the intestine). It is about the size of a walnut and surrounds part of the urethra (the tube that empties urine from the bladder). The prostate gland makes fluid that is part of the semen. Prostate cancer is most common in older men. In the US, about 1 in 7 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Signs of prostate cancer include weak flow of urine and frequent urination. These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by prostate cancer or by other conditions. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following:

  • Weak or interrupted (“stop and go”) flow of urine
  • Sudden urge to urinate
  • Frequent urination (especially at night)
  • Trouble starting the flow of urine
  • Trouble emptying the bladder completely
  • Pain or burning while urinating
  • Blood in the urine or semen
  • A pain in the back, hips, or pelvis that doesn’t go away
  • Shortness of breath, feeling very tired, fast heartbeat, dizziness, or pale skin caused by anemia

Other conditions may cause the same symptoms. As men age, the prostate may get bigger and block the urethra or bladder. This may cause trouble urinating or sexual problems. The condition is called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and although it is not cancer, surgery may be needed. The symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia or of other problems in the prostate may be like symptoms of prostate cancer.

Prostate Cancer Diagnosis

Your doctor will gather your medical history and perform a physical exam which may include a digital rectal exam (DRE), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, transrectal ultrasound, transrectal MRI or biopsy. Most prostate cancers are first found during screening with a PSA test or a digital rectal exam.

Prostate Cancer Treatments

Your doctor will work closely with you to make sure you understand your diagnosis and treatment options.

Certain factors affect your prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options depend on the following:

  • The stage of the cancer (level of PSA, Gleason score, grade of the tumor, how much of the prostate is affected by the cancer, and whether the cancer has spread to other places in the body)
  • Your age
  • Whether the cancer has just been diagnosed or has recurred (come back)
  • Whether you have other health problems
  • The expected side effects of treatment
  • Past treatment for prostate cancer
  • Your wishes

Source: NIH: National Cancer Institute

Bladder Cancer

About Bladder Cancer

The bladder is a hollow organ in your lower abdomen that stores urine. Bladder cancer occurs in the lining of the bladder. It is the sixth most common type of cancer in the United States.

Symptoms include:

  • Blood in your urine
  • A frequent urge to urinate
  • Pain when you urinate
  • Low back pain

Risk factors for developing bladder cancer include smoking and exposure to certain chemicals in the workplace. People with a family history of bladder cancer or who are older, white, or male have a higher risk.

Bladder Cancer Diagnosis

Your doctor will gather your medical history, perform a physical exam and tests that may include an urinalysis, urine cytology, and/or cystoscopy.

Bladder Cancer Treatments

Your doctor will work closely with you to make sure you understand your diagnosis and treatment options. Treatments for bladder cancer include endoscopic surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biologic therapy. Biologic therapy boosts your body’s own ability to fight cancer.

Source: NIH: National Cancer Institute

Kidney Cancer

About Kidney Cancer

There are two kidneys, one on each side of the spine, above the waist. The kidneys clean the blood to take out waste and make urine. Urine collects in the area at the center of the kidney and then passes through the ureter, into the bladder, and out of the body. They kidneys also make hormones that help control blood pressure and signal the bone marrow to make red blood cells when needed.

There are three main types of kidney cancer. Renal cell cancer is the most common type in adults and Wilms tumors are the most common in children. These types form in the tissues of the kidney that make urine. Transitional cell cancer forms in the renal pelvis and ureter in adults.

Smoking and taking certain pain medicines for a long time can increase the risk of adult kidney cancer. Certain inherited disorders can increase the risk of kidney cancer in children and adults. These include von-Hippel-Lindau syndrome, hereditary leimyomatosis and renal cell cancer, Birt-Hogg-Dube’ syndrome, and hereditary papillary renal cancer.

Kidney tumors may be benign or malignant.

Kidney Cancer Diagnosis

Your doctor will gather your medical history and perform a physical exam, and medical tests which may include an ultrasound exam, blood chemistry studies, urinalysis, liver function test, intravenous pyelogram (IVP), CT scan, MRI, and/or biopsy.

Kidney Cancer Treatments

Your doctor will work closely with you to make sure you understand your diagnosis and treatment options. The type of treatments recommended will depend on your diagnosis. Options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, biologic therapy, targeted therapy and/or clinical trials.

Source: NIH, National Cancer Institute

Testicular Cancer

About Testicular Cancer

The testicles are two glands inside the scrotum (a sac of loose skin below the penis). The testicles make sperm and the hormone testosterone.

Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men 15-34 years of age. The two main types of testicular tumors are seminoma and nonseminoma. Nonseminomas ten to grow and spread more quickly than seminomas.

The most common sign of testicular cancer is a lump or swelling in the testicle. Most testicular cancers can be cured, even if they are diagnosed at an advanced stage.

Treatment for testicular cancer can cause infertility by decreasing the amount of sperm made by the body. Men who want to have children may want to use sperm banking to store sperm before they begin treatment.

Testicular Cancer Diagnosis

Your doctor will gather your medical history, perform a physical exam and medical tests, which may include an ultrasound exam, serum tumor marker test, and/or inguinal orchiectomy.

Testicular Cancer Treatments

Your doctor will work closely with you to make sure you understand your diagnosis and treatment options. The type of treatments recommended will depend on your diagnosis. Options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, surveillance, high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant and/or clinical trials.

Source: NIH, National Cancer Institute